I need advice for me

Need help? You’ve come to the right place.

Here you will find useful information prior to coming into treatment.
Residents participate in a 12 Step Recovery Programme, that is tailored to their needs.
Support is not just geared towards abstinence, but designed to meet each individual’s mental, spiritual and emotional needs too.

How can you help me?

The simple answer is that if you have made the decision to change, we can support that process with medical, residential, pastoral and counselling therapies. It’s not an easy decision to make – and this is no holiday camp. We know that this programme works. Many men are now living happy, fulfilling lives – with wives, families and careers – and are COMPLETELY drug and alcohol free, because of their commitment to living by the rules and programme of Livingstone House.

YOU make the decision to change…WE help you along the journey to recovery. It’s a partnership between us and you.

We have tried to supply as much information as we can here on our website, however if you have any further questions you can take a look at our FAQs page or please get in touch.

What to expect during your treatment

Our facilities

Comfortable, homely accommodation

We occupy 5 large comfortable residential homes, consisting of different levels of support depending on your requirements, so no matter where you are on your journey, you will always feel safe and comfortable.

Treatment areas

We have a wide range of treatment facilities and areas across the Livingstone House network. We've got everything from one-to-one counselling suite, group session rooms, medical facilities and communal areas.

Training and vocational qualifications

All staff are minimum trained to a diploma in health and social care. L3 and L5. Staff are supported to under take Counselling qualifications. We are also a named placement for Birmingham children trust for trainee social work students.

Helpful resources

For fast help and advice please see our suggestions and links to useful websites that contain official medical advice below.

Reaching out to a family member for support is often the first step to helping yourself onto the road to recovery. Honesty is the best approach; however, timing is crucial. Make time to sit down in privacy with the person you have decided to confide in.

 

Go into the conversation with an open mind, someone you have a trusting relationship with will most likely be concerned and will want to help you; however be prepared for a negative reaction. Remember you are not alone, and we would encourage you to contact professional services for advice.

You may feel confusion or loss during recovery. Invest in more healthy recreational activities such as finding new or old hobbies, and listening to music as well as attending fellowship meetings for support.

 

We often receive feedback from service users, who have plummeted that far into addiction, that they are not connected to any hobbies or interests. We will support you to explore new interests and take risks in areas that you may not have had the confidence to explore previously. 

Local services

I need help now

If you or someone you care about needs urgent help now, you can:
Call your GP and ask for an emergency appointment
Call NHS 111
Contact your mental health crisis team (if you have one)
Call Samaritans free on 116 123 or email jo@samaritans.org
If you are in a life threatening situation right now please call 999

Still not sure where to start? Check out our FAQs or please get in touch.

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If you would like more information or advice, please fill out the form below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

I need help now

If you or someone you care about needs urgent help now, you can:
Call your GP and ask for an emergency appointment
Call NHS 111
Contact your mental health crisis team (if you have one)
Call Samaritans free on 116 123 or email jo@samaritans.org
If you are in a life threatening situation right now please call 999